Peter McCormack strike-out application set for November

The Court in charge of the Wright v McCormack trial has informed both parties that Peter McCormack’s late strike-out application will be heard on November 23, 2020. The application, though not yet publicly available, will ask the Court to dismiss Craig Wright’s libel suit against McCormack. McCormack filed his application on July 24, 2020, seemingly in response to Wright’s own application, filed the week before, for permission to amend his pleadings to include an additional claim under the UK Data Protection Act 2018. Both applications will be heard together.

The application itself is part of a recent pattern of behavior by defendant McCormack to delay or otherwise avoid having to defend himself in 2021’s trial. This is strange considering his apparent zest for defending his statements in Court at the beginning of the lawsuit.

In fact, McCormack was only sued after Wright made clear, publicly, that he would be defending his reputation in Court against the alleged libels of his detractors, and McCormack, in response, republished the alleged libel against Wright and all but dared Wright to make good on his threat. Where McCormack’s confidence has gone is anybody’s guess, as the last thing McCormack now appears to want is to face Wright in Court. 

Though the application itself has yet to be released to the public, having a date set provides a clearer picture of how this case will proceed over the course of the rest of the year. The parties are due to exchange disclosure lists on September 4, and the Court will not hear McCormack’s strike-out application until November 23. Parties were notified that the hearing has been allocated two days, so it is set to conclude on November 24. In July, McCormack unsuccessfully asked the Court to delay disclosure until after his strike-out application had been heard.

CoinGeek will be covering all updates to the Wright v McCormack lawsuit, including the details of McCormack’s strike-out application and the outcome, as they become publicly available.

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