HandCash brings multi-send, faster transactions in new update

HandCash now lets you send funds to multiple friends at once. In its latest update, the wallet introduced the multi-send feature, allowing users to send money to up to 50 friends at once.

To activate multi-send, you need to long-press on one of the contacts in your list. You can then select any other friend to include them on the transaction. Once that’s done, you can opt to add a note, input the amount you wish to send to each friend.

The feature was welcomed by HandCash users, especially those who relied on it for enterprise use. With multi-send, they can now send money to several people all at once, be they suppliers or employees.

The update also introduces improvements on the user interface, including a better feel of the buttons and a more consistent look. The wallet will have redesigned dialogs and animations through its app. And while HandCash transactions are quite fast, the new update promises even faster transactions. For those who’ve had issues with phone validation, the HandCash team has fixed this as well with this new update.

The update is only available for Android users for now, with the iOS version scheduled to be released in a few days. The iOS update will give users some of the benefits that have not been available for them yet, such as biometric lock, faster transactions, and fixes to some of the bugs affecting them. The iOS app will also be able to remember if you prefer to keep your balance hidden after the update.

The HandCash team also promised to work on a feature that will allow you to open multiple handles using one phone number.

HandCash has always been on the frontline in innovating ways to make the experience better for its users. Late last year, the wallet became the first non-custodial Bitcoin to launch two-factor authentication backup. With the 2FA backup, the wallet sought to reduce the risk for their users, effectively eliminating the 12-word seed system. 40% of its users end up taking screenshots of the 12-word seeds, which is quite dangerous. Others end up writing them down with typos, risking losing their Bitcoin.

New to Bitcoin? Check out CoinGeek’s Bitcoin for Beginners section, the ultimate resource guide to learn more about Bitcoin—as originally envisioned by Satoshi Nakamoto—and blockchain.

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