Bitcoin.com has re-launched a notary service that was originally made for BTC.

For less than a dollar (or 0.0005 BCH), you can now have your documents certified, timestamped, and linked to encrypted data recorded on the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) blockchain forever. Bitcoin.com has launched a notary service built on the BCH blockchain—one that was originally deployed on the legacy chain last year but had to be abandoned temporarily due to high fees and network congestion.

While eNotary has been around for some time, this is a step that demonstrates another efficient use of blockchains, particularly in the area of identity and proofs. Within ten minutes, you can have an easily verifiable, universal proof of your contracts, certificates, and other legal documents without even having to step out of your home. And despite this proof being easily accessible and verifiable from anywhere by anyone using block explorers, the data itself is secured since the only proof recorded is a cryptographic abridgement of the document along with the timestamp.

“You control your own information — your document’s contents are not stored in the blockchain or ever exposed.

Prove your document existed by comparing the blockchain entry of your document’s cryptographic digest to your actual document (if and when the need arises).”

Bitcoin.com Notary also cites patent application and proof of ownership of copyrighted material as an area of benefit, as it would otherwise cost upwards of $10,000 and takes over a year to process. Proving the original form of the document in case of changes or tampering is also a plus, as the cryptographic digest on your file is linked to a tamper-proof record on the blockchain. The timestamp is also there to support evidence in case warranted.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true  Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.