Organizer says they hope to do it again soon—with blockchain-based tickets.

Mid-last month, we wrote about how a small group’s plan to meet up at a bar turned into an all-out preparation for something so much bigger—the first Bitcoin Cash Conference in Amsterdam last Wednesday, February 27 at TQ was a wild success. A total of 120 people attended the conference, which is a whopping 95% turnout from the online guest list, and that’s despite weather conditions. Attendees included locals as well as guests from Germany, Belgium, and the UK.

The conference revolved around areas of opportunity for fast and low-cost payments, as well as spearheading supporting services and infrastructure. VP for business development, Alejandro de la Torre advocated for improvements that would enable quick and widespread traction such as money transfer services, B2B payment systems, and even physical merchant services such as POS terminals. He also reiterated the importance of community-driven events.

“The importance of participating in these type of events is very important for us at – we all had a wonderful time and look forward to continuing providing support and meeting with the Bitcoin Cash community. A big thanks to Bitcoin Cash Netherlands for organizing this event. It was a success, through and through,” says De La Torre.

De La Torre also says that the community should focus on building the community and gathering talent instead of bashing other tokens and projects—something that has been rampant in the crypto community.

Joannes Vermorel, founder of the company Lokad—which is currently working with nChain on testing 1Gb blocks known as the Terab project, explained the technicalities behind on-chain scaling, and confirmed that a “production ready” version of the code supporting 1Gb blocks should be out by the end of the year.

The conference did not limit itself to business discussions: social impact is one of the biggest applications for blockchain, and Bitcoin Cash’s fast and cheap transactions can efficiently provide the platform through which donations can be made. Event organizer Remy de Vries conducted an interview with a group called @eatbch, a program set on alleviating hunger and poverty in Venezuela—the country has been suffering immense economic depression since 2013. Donations from guests were sent instantly via BCH.

Overall, the conference was a pleasant one, with guests Tweeting photos of the event.

If you missed out on this one, don’t worry: the organizers say they would love to do it again soon. In fact, de Vries says tickets may even be blockchain-based next time.

“Our future looks good, the plan is to organize more of these events. Infrastructure is being planned and built to streamline the sign-ups and reservation system. The goal is to have conference tickets ‘on-chain’ this year as a great proof of concept of this technology,” de Vries wrote to CoinGeek.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true  Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.